The official reprints of the 19th century stamps of Austria

Preliminary remarks

The most important knowledge about reprints is that they exist! Any unused 1850s and newspaper stamps after the Mercuries that you are offered for sale are very likely to be reprints. (Unused Mercuries are more likely to be fakes than reprints.) All these things exist with fake cancellations. Reprints exist of values of later issues that were not issued, or issued only on postal stationery. Reprints exist of essays!

[Note: there was also extensive reprinting of postal stationery, which will not be discussed here - see Ferchenbauer and Schneiderbauer for more information. But be warned that there are even more reprints of postal stationery than there are of stamps. The reprints of the essays for the first envelopes, and then of the 1861 envelopes themselves, are dangerous. But there are reprints of loads of other postal stationery items.]

Warning (1): There is a book "100 Jahre Österreichische Briefmarke" published by the Austrian State Printing Works in 1950. An appendix contains full-colour reproductions of some of the classical Austrian stamps: the first few issues, the Rose Mercury, the 10Kr Jubilee, the 10S Dolfuss etc. These are sometimes cut out, perforated, and offered for sale as mint stamps, or proof copies. One way of distinguishing them is that the colours are "too good"; also they are on a thickish creamy card.

Warning (2): the printing inks (particularly lilac, yellow and green shades) are photosensitive; the gum is a valuable aid to classification and many of the reprints are prone to mildew and mould so the stamps should be stored in a dry place; and as the perforations are both fragile and another valuable classification aid, the use of an oversized black mounting strip is recommended. Also, note that 'Ferchenbauer-2000' gives prices in Euros.

Back to Austrian Stamps homepage Back to top Introduction Sources for this article Classification of Reprints
Table I - List of all official reprints by year of reprinting, with detailed descriptions of each Table II - List of all official reprints by issue, with quantities Table III - Reprint Die Proofs (1870) Table IV - Reprint Plate Proofs (1884) Table V - Fellner Reprints (1885?)
 

Introduction

In the 1860s, the demand for specimens of earlier stamps of Austria from foreign postal administrations and collectors was increasing steadily. Official records reveal that in 1865 the postal administration of Baden sent a collection of their stamps, consisting of originals as well as reprints, to the Austrian postal administration and asked for a collection of Austrian stamps in exchange. As copies of demonetised stamps were no longer available and in order to satisfy the demand, the Austrian authorities decided in 1866 to have them reprinted. Thus the era of reprinting in Austria began, lasting until 1910.

In January 1866 the Ministry of Commerce ordered the first reprints of stamps and from the State Bureau of Printing (k.k. Hof und Staatsdruckerei), Vienna, which also produced all following reprints. As a rule, the reprints were delivered to the 'Wertzeichen-Haupt-Depot' of the 'Post-Oekonomie-Verwaltung' in Vienna, and sold to the public. The exception was the reprint of 1866, the sole purpose of which was to supply foreign postal administrations and possibly some high personages. (The interest of High Personages in philately was, one suspects, driven by considerations not entirely philatelic)

Edwin Müller relates that a sales counter had been opened at the main post office in Vienna sometime in 1864, where the remainder of the 1860/61 issue as well as all current stamps and envelopes were on sale at face value. This included those used in the province of Venetia which were unobtainable anywhere else in Austria. This counter was closed in 1866 because of lack of business, only some three hundred Gulden worth of stamps having been sold. The unsold stock of the 1860/61 issue was then officially destroyed.

The sales window was re-opened sometime in 1870, probably at the time the second printing of reprint stamps had been produced. These and all subsequent reprints were sold to the public at face value and the proceeds used to cover the manufacturing costs; any surplus going to the Pension Fund of the Employees of the State Bureau of Printing.

The reprints of 1866 were never sold officially to the public. The State Bureau of Printing was ordered to produce five hundred copies of all demonetised stamps. However, a considerably larger quantity, possibly one thousand, were actually produced. Five hundred sets were delivered to the Ministry of Commerce as ordered and were distributed among foreign postal administrations and some high personages as mentioned before. The remaining portion of the printing, however, was kept by the State Bureau of Printing for many years. Ultimately, a high placed person obtained this stock and sold it to the well-known Viennese stamp dealer Rudolf Friedl from whom the reprints found their way into private collections.

When the first reprints were ordered, new plate settings had to be assembled, the original settings being no longer in existence. However, individual clichés and in some instances the original dies had been preserved from the time when production of the original stamps was discontinued. It was necessary therefore to produce new clichés for the reprint settings. This was not accomplished in a uniform way.

For the postal issue of 1850 (Kreuzer and Centes), electrotyped clichés of Type III and sub-types were still available. One of each denomination was selected and thoroughly cleaned before it served as the basis from which were produced, by the galvanoplastic process, the clichés required for the reprint settings. In some instances, retouches were made on the matrix and consequently the design of the reprint differs from the original of the same type in certain details.

It has been generally accepted that the clichés for all reprints of each denomination of the first issue were derived from one master cliché for each value, and that all of them were of Type III. Kohn doubts the correctness of this statement on two counts. First, as an exception a stereotyped cliché of Type Ib served as master for the clichés of the 1 Kreuzer value of the 1870, 1884 and 1887 reprints. Second, in a few instances reprint clichés of the same denomination were produced from different clichés of Type III (as shown in the illustrations accompanying Kohn's article).

Of the 5 Centes value, all original stamps were printed from Type I clichés, this being the only value unknown in the re-engraved state of Type III. For the reprints, however, only clichés of Type III were used, which may indicate that production of original stamps of Type III had been contemplated.

For the Mercury newspaper stamps, all reprint clichés were cast directly from a cleaned original die of Type II which had remained in the storerooms of the State Bureau of Printing. However, retouching in certain spots of the design occurred between printings. For instance, a colour spot in the shadowed part of the chin, which shows in the 1866 reprints, does not appear on any later printings. Apart from this, however, the stamps produced in the seven printings are fairly uniform in design and a distinction between them is possible mainly on the basis of shades of colour and the paper.

The clichés for the reprints of the newspaper stamps of 1858/9 also were cast from original dies. One of Type I served for the 1870 reprint clichés and one of Type II for all other clichés. The spacing between the stamps is a characteristic to distinguish reprints from the originals. The originals are spaced horizontally mm to 1mm and vertically 3mm to 3mm. The reprints have a spacing of 1mm to 3mm horizontally and of 5mm to 5mm vertically.

Edwin Mueller has reported that reprint plate settings consisted of only 25 subjects and that four impressions were made from each setting on every sheet. Reprint sheets were thus of one hundred stamps each, and reprints of St. Andrew's Crosses do not exist.

For the normally perforated issues, the reprints were line perforated without exception. The original stamps of the same type come only in harrow perforation, the one exception being the 3 Soldi black of 1858 which was issued as an original in a very narrow line perforation. (There is a variety of perforation types described in detail in the Oliva Catalogue of Italian stamps).

For the reprints, the paper employed was identical with that in use at the time for the current issues. From 1864 to 1890 it was machine made, watermarked BRIEF-MARKEN for the postal issues and ZEITUNGS-MARKEN for the newspaper stamps. Thus, while the paper used in the first (1866) and last (1904) reprints had no watermark, that for the 1870, 1884 and 1887 printings of postal stamps was watermarked BRIEF-MARKEN. The 1894 reprints of postal stamps and all reprintings of newspaper stamps were produced on paper bearing the watermark ZEITUNGS-MARKEN. The gum of the reprint stamps is smooth and white; in a few instances it is slightly yellowish. The reprints in general show clearer impressions than the originals; those of 1866 are remarkably fine. Their shades of color are brighter and fresher than are those of the original stamps.

Reprints were not valid for the payment of postage, but postmarked reprints exist, as it was possible to have them cancelled at the philatelic window at the time of purchase. The most frequent postmark bears the inscription 'Postwertzeichen Verschleisstelle Wien' and the date when cancelled.

Other Reprints

The tables which follow list the official printings in three groups: Table I, by year of manufacture, Table II groups the reprints by issues, and Tables III to V list the Die Proof, Plate Proof and Fellner Reprints. Whenever Types and Sub- Types are mentioned they refer to those listed in Edwin Mueller's Specialized Catalogue 1952.

Table VI of the Kohn article gives lists of the colours of the reprints of the newspaper stamps. However, I have omitted it, as there is almost complete disagreement between the various authorities on the name of a given item! For example, the 1887 reprint of the 1851 30kr stamp is called 'pale wine red' by E Müller, 'dark violet rose' by H Kropf, 'dull rose' by E D Bacon, 'violettrosa' by Ferchenbauer, and 'karmin zinnober' by Netto [none of these colours are mentioned in the Michel tables and only dull-rose in SG's]. The best available tabulation of colours must be the numerous illustrations in Ferchenbauer 2000 - if you need the information, borrow or even better buy the book!


Back to Austrian Stamps homepage Back to top Introduction Sources for this article Classification of Reprints
Table I - List of all official reprints by year of reprinting, with detailed descriptions of each Table II - List of all official reprints by issue, with quantities Table III - Reprint Die Proofs (1870) Table IV - Reprint Plate Proofs (1884) Table V - Fellner Reprints (1885?)

 

Classification of the Reprints

A comparison of the serial letters/numbers given to the issues follows; note the differing treatments of the reprint delivered in 1890 & 1892! All this may suggest that the year of the reprint is the best unambiguous name.

 Year of reprint   Nickname   Ferch.   Kohn   Netto   Michel 
1866 Museums I 1866 1 I
1870 -- II 1870 2 II
1873 Orphanage -- 1873 -- --
1884 -- III 1884 3 III
1885? Fellner -- 1885? -- --
1886 -- IV 1886 4 IV
1887 -- V 1887 5 V
1890 -- VI 1890
1892 -- 1892
1894 -- 1894 6 VII
1904 -- VII 1904 7 VIII
1907 Kropf -- 1907 -- --
 

Sources of this article

It all began with an email asking for information in English on the reprints. My queries received the Dalmatian Rejoinder: if you want it, write it. Luckily, the Library Index pointed me to Frank Kohn's article in the Bulletin of the APS of NY, vol XIII No 1-2 (1961), with the title 'The Official Reprints Of The 19th Century Stamps Of Austria'. I also discovered that in 1981, Gisbert Zenker wrote the section on Classical Reprints for Dr U. Ferchenbauer's Österreich 1850-1918 4th Edition Vienna 1981 p363ff. - and APS member Mr R. Dehn FRPSL had prepared a translation of this for his own use, and has kindly allowed me to use it. The same Zenker article, slightly altered and with lavish colour illustrations, is in Ferchenbauer's '2000' edition, pp 726-755; Zenker had by then died.

This article is based on Kohn's APSNY article. In general the Kohn and Zenker- Ferchenbauer articles agree; significant differences are mentioned in the text. Zenker gives as the main sources the works by Kropf and Müller in Kohn's list below. Henry Pollak comments that Kropf and Ohrt are the original sources of much of the knowledge, and that Ohrt has some 78 pages on reprints of Austria (including stationery)! There do seem to be more articles than separate bodies of knowledge, and in this situation, errors and speculations can soon become cast-in-concrete facts. Kohn used findings based on his original research, and on the following sources:

And of course anyone starting today to study the reprints must consult Ferchenbauer, uniquely so for the illustrations.


Back to Austrian Stamps homepage Back to top Introduction Sources for this article Classification of Reprints
Table I - List of all official reprints by year of reprinting, with detailed descriptions of each Table II - List of all official reprints by issue, with quantities Table III - Reprint Die Proofs (1870) Table IV - Reprint Plate Proofs (1884) Table V - Fellner Reprints (1885?)


 

TABLE I - LIST OF ALL OFFICIAL REPRINTS BY YEAR OF REPRINTING

General note: the values of 2 Soldi, 3 Soldi, and 15 Soldi of the 1861 issue were planned for use in Lombardy-Venetia. They were never issued, probably never even printed. However, the master dies were preserved and the clichés for the reprint settings obtained from them.

REPRINT OF 1866

Postage Stamps

18501kr yellow, 2kr, 3kr, 6kr, 9kr;
5Ct yellow, 10Ct, 15Ct, 30Ct, 45Ct
18582kr yellow, 3kr black, 3kr green, 5kr, 10kr, 15kr
2s yellow-orange, 3s black, 3s green, 5s, 10s, 15s
18612kr yellow, 3kr, 5kr, 10kr, 15kr;
2s yellow, 3s, 5s, 10s, 15s & 3s in yellow (*)

(*) An error of colour occurred in that a cliché of the 3 Soldi had slipped into a 2 Soldi setting. Only a few copies of the 3 Soldi yellow may exist (Müller says 20, Ohrt says 10).

Newspaper Stamps (The newspaper stamps values can also be stated in Soldi; this I ignore)

18510.6kr blue, 6kr yellow, 30kr rose, 6kr scarlet
18581.05kr blue, 1.05kr lilac
18611.05kr lilac

The printing is very careful, fine, and clear; the embossing is good. (The exception is the 1858 5 Soldi on which the colour has not 'seized' the paper. It seems to have been dabbed on without regularity or evenness.) The colours are bright and even. The paper is thick, pure white without watermark; the gum thin and yellowish white.

The perforated issues of 1858 and 1861 show regular line perforation 12 with only slight variation (large holes, narrow, pointed teeth). Stamps with strikingly large margins occur (particularly the 5 Soldi of 1858).

Reprints of the 1850 issue are of the types and subtypes used in the last period of this issue. 1, 2, and 6Kr as well as 10, 15, 30 and 45 Ct are type III. The 3Kr is type IIIc and the 9Kr type IIIb, whilst the 5Ct is type III. Reprints of the 1851 newspaper stamps are type IIc and of both the definitive and newspaper stamps of 1858 are type II.

500 of each were officially printed (in reality over 1,000). The quantities available to the public of the 1866 reprint varied from stamp to stamp, as the reprint was primarily to meet the needs of foreign postal administrations. Only what was left after meeting this requirement was sold at face value to the public.

REPRINT OF 1870

Postage Stamps

18501kr yellow, 2kr, 3kr, 6kr, 9kr;
5Ct yellow, 10Ct, 15Ct, 30Ct, 45Ct
18582kr yellow, 3kr black, 3kr green, 5kr, 10kr, 15kr
2s yellow, 3s black, 3s green, 5s, 10s, 15s
18612kr yellow, 3kr, 5kr, 10kr, 15kr;
2s yellow, 3s, 5s, 10s, 15s

Newspaper Stamps

18510.6kr blue, 6kr yellow, 30kr rose, 6kr scarlet
18581.05kr blue, 1.05kr lilac
1861 (*)1.05kr lilac
18631.05kr lilac

(*) Ferchenbauer does not list this stamp - but he does illustrate it, on page 747 row 4 item 2!

The printing is bad, irregular, ill-defined and unclean (giving a clouded impression); the embossing is flat. The colours are mostly strong, but applied unevenly. The shade varies, often within a sheet. Thick white paper with a sheet watermark BRIEF-MARKEN or ZEITUNGS-MARKEN was used. The gum is yellowish and brittle, with slight cracks, but without defects.

The perforated issues of 1858 and 1861 are reprinted with an irregular line perforation 10. The 10 and 15Kr as well as the 2 and 3 Soldi of the 1861 issue are mixed perf 9:10. Large irregularities are possible.

Reprints of the 1850 issue are of the types and subtypes used in the last period of this issue. 1, 2, and 6Kr as well as 10, 15, 30 and 45 Ct are type III. [Kohn says the 1Kr is found as type Ib.] The 3Kr is type IIIc and the 9Kr type IIIb, whilst the 5Ct is type III. The newspaper stamps of 1851 are type IIb and those of 1858 are, exceptionally, type I

5000 each of the definitives and 10,000 each of the newspaper stamps were issued. Single proofs were made of this reprint, in original colours on ungummed tinted paper of indifferent quality, both for the postage and the newspaper stamps. They are rare. The reprinted stamps also exist with a handstamped overprint SPECIMEN; this is rarer than the correspondingly overprinted 1884 issue.

REPRINT OF 1873

Newspaper Tax Stamps

1853/582kr green, 4kr brown; 4kr red; 1kr black; 2kr red

This is the so-called Orphanage Reprint. The printing is careful & fine from cleaned clichés; the colours bright and evenly printed. The paper is smooth, yellowish white with ZEITUNGS-MARKEN sheet watermark. The gum is smooth & white with a tendency to crack, which is occasionally only weakly applied. With this reprint, the stamps were printed closer together, so that (contrary to other reprints) wide margins cannot occur.

The types are: 2Kr green - type Ib; 1Kr black - type IIb of the 1Kr blue; 2 Kr red - Plate 2 of the 2Kr brown; 4 Kr brown and red - Cliche of the 2Kr brown with altered figure of value. 1400 (1700 of the 4 Kr red) were printed, of which 1000 were delivered and the rest kept back by the State Printing Office.

REPRINT OF 1884

Postage Stamps

18501kr orange, 2kr, 3kr, 6kr, 9kr; 5Ct orange, 10Ct, 15Ct, 30Ct, 45Ct
18582kr yellow (*), 3kr black, 3kr green, 5kr, 10kr, 15kr
2s yellow, 3s black, 3s green, 5s, 10s, 15s
18612kr yellow, 3kr, 5kr, 10kr, 15kr; 2s yellow, 3s, 5s, 10s, 15s
18632kr yellow, 3kr, 5kr, 10kr, 15kr; 2s yellow, 3s, 5s, 10s, 15s

(*) The 2kr yellow 1858 reprint is exceedingly rare - see below.

Newspaper Stamps

18510.6kr blue, 6kr yellow, 30kr rose, 6kr scarlet
18581.05kr blue, 1.05kr lilac
18611.05kr lilac
18631.05kr lilac

The printing is very careful, clean, & clear from cleaned clichés; the embossing is sharp. The colours are mostly dull and delicate. The paper is thin yellow-toned paper with the BRIEF-MARKEN or ZEITUNGS-MARKEN sheet watermark in its newer form (ie with wide letters, border watermark). The gum is smooth, yellowish white and in part brittle, with slight cracks but without defects.

The perforated stamps have been cleanly line perforated 13. Exceptionally, two values, the 2Kr and 10Kr of 1858, are also found line perforated 12.

Reprints of the 1850 issue are of the types and subtypes used in the last period of this issue. The 1 Kr is in type Ib; the 2Kr and 6Kr as well as 10, 15, 30 and 45 Ct are type III. The 3Kr is type IIIc and the 9Kr type IIIb, whilst the 5Ct is type III. The newspaper stamps of 1851 are type IIb; 1858 are type II. 2,500 each of the definitives and 1000 of the newspaper stamps were issued.

By far the rarest reprint is the lemon yellow 2Kr value of the 1861 issue, which is missing even in great collections. The origin of this stamp has not been entirely explained. The whole edition of the 1861 2Kr was reprinted in the wrong shade and was returned by the Trade Ministry to the State Printing Office with the instruction that it be destroyed and replaced with stamps printed in the right colour. The reprint in the right colour should have been delivered in June 1885. However, the reprints of this stamp are so seldom found that the following hypotheses arise.

  1. Only the greater part of the delivery was destroyed, because some of the stamps were not completely in the wrong shade; as a result the reprinting asked for was not in fact carried out; or
  2. The new delivery was not of 2500 stamps but much fewer.

There is also the possibility that for some unknown reason the majority of this reprint was printed later and had the general style and appearance of the 1887 reprints and so perhaps was delivered late together with the 1886 reprints of the newspaper stamps (see these).

There exist proof sheets of the 1884 reprints in the original colours on thin ungummed paper; these are not rare, and can be found also in blocks. There are also single proofs of the Mercuries reprints in the original colours on thin ungummed paper; these are rare! SPECIMEN overprints are commoner on the 1884 reprints.

REPRINT OF 1886

Newspaper Stamps

18510.6kr blue, 6kr yellow, 30kr rose, 6kr scarlet
18581.05kr blue, 1.05kr lilac
18611.05kr lilac
18631.05kr lilac

The printing impression is careful and clean but a little less so than for the reprints of 1884. The embossing is good. Dull colours; the lilac in particular is washed-out and greyish in tone. No special defects. The paper has possibly been toned yellowish with tobacco juice. The sheet watermark is ZEITUNGS-MARKEN. The gum is smooth and yellowish.

The newspaper stamps of 1851 are type IIb; the 1858 newspaper stamps are type II. Probably 2000 of each value were issued; perhaps less. The order for the newspaper stamps was given in October 1885 and should have been delivered by the State Printing Office in April 1886. However the order for reprints of some envelopes which was given at the same time was not delivered until February 1887.

The 1886 reprint is much scarcer than the 1000-stamp reprint of 1884. So we must suppose that either the figure of 2000 given in the literature is too high, or that possibly the greater part of this 1886 reprinting was for some reason delayed [for the envelopes the delay is documented], with the result that the majority of the 1886 reprints had the appearance of the 1887 ones, and so cannot be distinguished from them. SPECIMEN overprints are not found

REPRINT OF 1887

Postage Stamps

18501kr yellow, 1kr orange;
5Ct yellow, 5Ct orange
18582kr yellow, 2kr orange, 3kr black, 3kr green
2s yellow, 2s orange, 3s black, 3s green
18612kr yellow, 2kr orange, 3kr; 2s yellow, 2s orange, 3s
18632kr yellow, 2kr orange, 3kr; 2s yellow, 2s orange, 3s

Newspaper Stamps

18510.6kr blue, 6kr yellow, 30kr rose, 6kr scarlet
18581.05kr blue, 1.05kr lilac
18611.05kr lilac

The printing is relatively clear and clean, but also (especially for the 3Kr of 1858) lacking in sharpness; some good embossing. The colours are partly dull. The lilac newspaper stamps are liable to fade. The paper is yellowish white, on average more or less strong predominantly woven paper with either BRIEF-MARKEN or ZEITUNGS-MARKEN watermark. The gum is smooth and yellowish white.

The reprints of the 1858 and 1861 definitive issues show very irregular line perforation 12 (the holes are small, the teeth wide and blunt). The 1863 issue have irregular line 10 perforation. Reprints of the 1850 issue are of the types and subtypes used in the last period of this issue. The 1850 1Kr is type Ib; the 2Kr and 6Kr as well as 10, 15, 30 and 45 Ct are type III. The 3Kr is type IIIc and the 9Kr type IIIb; the 5Ct is type III. The newspaper stamps of 1851 are type IIb and those of 1858 are type II.

10,000 of each were issued. On both values of the 1858 Newspaper stamp there is a plate fault 'Bulge on lower throat border'; the same plate fault exists with the 1894 reprints. SPECIMEN overprints were made on all values of this reprint.

REPRINT of 1890

Postage Stamps

18582kr orange

In June 1889, 10,000 copies of the orange 2Kr of 1858 were ordered and delivered in May 1890. Müller and Netto allocate these to a 2nd Issue of the 1887 reprints. However since the printing, colour, paper, and gum are identical with the 1894 reprints Ferchenbauer places them under the 1894 heading. Kohn lists them separately and so have I. Kohn also says 10,700 copies were printed.

REPRINT of 1892

Newspaper Stamps

18582s yellow, 2s orange

It is unclear when these copies of the 2s of 1858 were ordered or delivered. Müller and Netto allocate them to a 2nd Issue of the 1887 reprints. However since the printing, colour, paper, and gum are identical with the 1894 reprints Ferchenbauer places them under the 1894 heading. Kohn lists them separately as '1892' (so perhaps they were delivered then) and so have I. Kohn gives the printing as 10,700 for the yellow and 10,900 for the orange.

REPRINT of 1894

Postage Stamps

18502kr and 10Ct
18613s
18635kr, 10kr, 15kr
186710s
18835kr

Newspaper Stamps

18510.6kr blue, 6kr yellow, 30kr rose, 6kr scarlet
1858l.05kr blue, 1.05kr lilac
18611.05kr lilac
18631.05kr lilac

The printing is quite good, but the embossing is flat. The colours are mostly dull, and the lilac newspaper stamp again is likely to fade. The paper is thin yellowish or greyish white, translucent, sheet watermark ZEITUNGS-MARKEN - this was used also for the definitives. The gum is smooth, yellowish white, which makes the paper translucent.

The perforated definitives were line perforated 12, 10, 11, and 13 (the latter quite regular). The perforation 12 is that used also for the 1887 reprints. The perforation 10 has small holes and wide, blunt teeth; these are blunter than with the 1870 reprints. Reprints of the 1850 issue are of the types and subtypes used in the last period of this issue. 1, 2, and 6Kr as well as 10, 15, 30 and 45 Ct are type III. The 3Kr is type IIIc and the 9Kr type IIIb, whilst the 5Ct is type III. The newspaper stamps of 1851 are type IIb and those of 1858 are type II.

10,000 of each (more of some values: see Table II) were issued. See the 1890 & 1982 issues above for the reprints of the 1858 2Kr & 2s.

REPRINTS OF 1904

Newspaper Stamps

18510.6kr blue, 6kr yellow, 30kr rose, 6kr scarlet

The printing is quite careful. Part of the printing shows distinctly different shades from the rest, and most authors refer to separate I and II Printings. The paper is thin, yellowish white, generally clearly laid (gemaschtes) and without watermark. The gum is brushed on obliquely, yellowish white. All these stamps are type IIb. 20,000 sets were issued. In the second series of this reprint, horizontal wide-gutter pairs from the middle of the sheet are found (typical gutter 6mm) - expensive!


Back to Austrian Stamps homepage Back to top Introduction Sources for this article Classification of Reprints
Table I - List of all official reprints by year of reprinting, with detailed descriptions of each Table II - List of all official reprints by issue, with quantities Table III - Reprint Die Proofs (1870) Table IV - Reprint Plate Proofs (1884) Table V - Fellner Reprints (1885?)

 

TABLE II - LIST OF ALL OFFICIAL REPRINTS BY YEAR OF ORIGINAL ISSUE

Kohn pointed out that not every perforation variation mentioned below could be verified, due to lack of material; he has quoted the variations given by Hans Kropf, Edwin Müller and Paul Ohrt.

REPRINTS OF THE POSTAL STAMP ISSUE OF 1850

Quantities Reprinted

Year of reprint 1kr yellow 1kr orange 2kr black 3kr red 6kr brown 9kr blue
1866 500 -- 500 500 500 500
1870 5,000 -- 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000
1884 -- 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500
1887 10,000 10,000 -- -- -- --
1894 -- -- 10,000 -- -- --


Year of reprint 5Ct yellow 5Ct orange 10Ct black 15Ct red 30Ct brown 45Ct blue
1866 500 -- 500 500 500 500
1870 5,000 -- 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000
1884 -- 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500
1887 10,000 10,000 -- -- -- --
1894 -- -- 10,000 -- -- --

REPRINTS OF THE POSTAL STAMPS OF 1858

Quantities Reprinted and Perforations. Reprints of the Postal Issue of 1858 are all of Type II and line perforated.

Year of reprint 2kr yellow 2kr orange 3kr black 3kr green 5kr red 10kr blue 15kr brown
1866 500 -- 500 500 500 500 500
12   12 12 12 12 12
1870 5,000 -- 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000
10   10 10
10
10x11
11x10
11x10
10
10x10
10x10
11x10
10
10
1884 2,500 -- 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500
13   13 13 13 13 13
1887 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 -- -- --
11x12
12x12
11x12
12x12
12x12 11x12
11x12
12x12
     
1890 (**) -- 10,700 -- -- -- -- --
  12          

(**) Müller and Netto class these as a second issue of the 1887 reprints; Ferchenbauer as part of the 1894 reprints.

Year of reprint 2s yellow 2s orange 3s black 3s green 5s red 10s blue 15s brown
1866 500 -- 500 500 500 500 500
12   12 12 12 12 12
1870 5,000 -- 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000
10
10x10
  10 10
10
10x10
10x10
10
10
10x10
10x10
10x10
10
1884 2,500 -- 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500
13   13 13 13 13 13
1887 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 -- -- --
12x11 12x11
12x12
12x12
12x12
12x12
     
1892 (**) 10,700 10,900 -- -- -- -- --
12
12
12
12
         

(**) Müller and Netto class these as a second issue of the 1887 reprints; Ferchenbauer as part of the 1894 reprints.

REPRINTS OF THE POSTAL STAMPS OF 1861

Quantities Reprinted and Perforations

Note: the values of 2 Soldi, 3 Soldi, and 15 Soldi of the 1861 issue were planned for use in Lombardy-Venetia. They were never issued, probably never even printed. However, the master dies were preserved and the clichés for the reprint settings obtained from them.

Year of reprint 2kr yellow 2kr orange 3kr green 5kr red 10kr blue 15kr brown
1866 500 -- 500 500 500 500
12   12 12 12 12
1870 5,000 -- 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000
10   10 10
10
10x10
9x10
9x10
9x10
9x10
1884 2,500 -- 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500
13   13 13 13 13
1887 10,000 10,000 10,000 -- -- --
12x12
12
12x12
12
12x12      


Year of reprint 2s yellow 2s orange 3s green 5s red 10s blue 15s brown
1866 500 -- 500 500 500 500
12   12 12 12 12
1870 5,000 -- 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000
11
10x10
  10
10x10
9x11
9x10
9x10
9x10
10x10
10
10x11
1884 2,500 -- 2,500 () 2,500 2,500 2,500
13   13 13 13 13
1887 10,000 10,000 10,000 -- -- --
12x12
12x12
11x12
12x12
12x12
12x12
11x12
12x12
12x12
12x12
     
1894 -- -- 10,800 -- -- --
    13      

() An error of colour exists for the 1884 reprint of the 1861 3 Soldi stamp: yellow instead of green. Only a few copies of this variety are known to exist.

The reprints of this issue are all line perforated.

REPRINTS OF THE POSTAL STAMPS OF 1863

Quantities Reprinted and Perforations

Year of reprint 2kr yellow 2kr orange 3kr green 5kr red 10kr blue 15kr brown
1884 2,500 -- 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500
13   13 13 13 13
1887 10,000 10,000 10,000 -- -- --
10x10 10x10 10
10x10
10
     
1894 -- -- -- 10,700 10,800 10,000
      13 13 11
11


Year of reprint 2s yellow 2s orange 3s green 5s red 10s blue 15s brown
1884 2,500 -- 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500
13   13 13 13 13
1887 10,000 10,000 10,000 -- -- --
10 10 10x10
10
     

Note: Ferchenbauer does not list 2kr & 2s orange reprints of 1863 stamps in 1887. However he describes the yellow reprints as 'shades', a qualifier used for no other reprint.

REPRINTS OF POSTAL STAMPS OF THE ISSUES OF 1867

Issue of Denomination Perforation Year of Reprint Quantity Printed
1867 10s blue 10 1894 10,900

REPRINTS OF POSTAL STAMPS OF THE ISSUES OF 1883

Issue of Denomination Perforation Year of Reprint Quantity Printed
1883 5kr red 10 1894 10,500

REPRINTS OF NEWSPAPER TAX STAMPS

This is the 'Orphanage Reprint'.

Issue of Denomination Year of Reprint Quantity Printed
1853 2kr green 1873 1,400
1858/9 4kr brown 1873 1,400
1kr black 1873 1,400
2kr red 1873 1,400
4kr red 1873

REPRINTS OF NEWSPAPER STAMPS

Quantities Printed of the 1851 issue:

Year of reprint 0.6kr blue 6kr yellow 30kr rose 6kr vermilion
1866 500 500 500 500
1870 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000
1884 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
1886 (+) 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000
1887 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000
1894 (*) 10,600 10,700 10,000 11,300
1904/I
1904/II
20,000 (**) 20,000 (**) 20,000 (**) 20,000 (**)

Quantities Printed of the later issues:

Year of reprint 1858/59 blue 1858/59 lilac 1861 lilac 1863 lilac
1866 500 500 500 --
1870 10,000 10,000 10,000 (++) 10,000
1884 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
1886 (+) 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000
1887 10,000 10,000 10,000 --
1894* 10,600 11,200 10,000 10,000

(*) The quantity figures for the 1894 reprints are taken from Hans Kropf's book: according to Edwin Müller they are: '10,000 to 11,700 in some cases'.

(**) It's unclear whether there were 20,000 of each printing, or 20,000 in total.

(+) Ferchenbauer says 'these reprints are rarer than the 1884 ones which had a printing of 1000, so the commonly quoted figure of 2000 is not credible'

(++) Ferchenbauer does not list this reprint, but does illustrate it, on page 747 row 4 item 2.

Note: All reprints are of Type II except for the 1870 reprint of the 1858/59 issue which is Type I [although Netto says all are type I]


Back to Austrian Stamps homepage Back to top Introduction Sources for this article Classification of Reprints
Table I - List of all official reprints by year of reprinting, with detailed descriptions of each Table II - List of all official reprints by issue, with quantities Table III - Reprint Die Proofs (1870) Table IV - Reprint Plate Proofs (1884) Table V - Fellner Reprints (1885?)

 

TABLE III - REPRINT DIE PROOFS (1870)

Postage stamps

1850 1kr, 2kr, 3kr, 6kr, 9kr
5Ct, 10Ct, 15Ct, 30Ct, 45Ct
1858 2kr, 3kr black, 5kr, 10kr, 15kr, 3kr green
2s, 3s black, 5s, l0s, 15s, 3s green
1860/61 2kr, 3kr, 5kr, 10kr, 15kr
2s, 3s, 5s, 10s, 15s
also 3s on orange paper (made in 1894)
1863/64 2kr, 3kr, 5kr, 10kr, 15kr
2s, 3s, 5s, 10s, 15s

Newspaper stamps

1851 0.6kr blue, 6kr yellow, 30kr rose, 6kr scarlet
1858/9 l.05kr blue, 1.05kr lilac
1861 1.05kr lilac
1863 1.05kr lilac

 

TABLE IV - REPRINT PLATE PROOFS (1884)

Postage stamps

1850 1kr, 2kr, 3kr, 6kr, 9kr
5Ct, 10Ct, 15Ct, 30Ct, 45Ct
1858 2kr, 3kr black, 5kr, 10kr, 15kr, 3kr green;
2s, 3s black, 5s, 10s, 15s, 3s green
1860/61 2kr, 3kr, 5kr, 10kr, 15kr
2s, 3s, 5s, 10s, 15s
1863/64 2kr, 3kr, 5kr, 10kr, 15kr
2s, 3s, 5s, 10s, 15s

Only one sheet of 100 stamps of each denomination was produced. It was printed on thin unwatermarked paper in original colors and remained imperforated.


 

TABLE V - FELLNER REPRINTS (of 1885?)

Postage stamps

1850 1kr; 1kr printed on both sides;
5Ct
1858 2kr yellow; 2kr orange; 3kr black; 3kr green;
2s yellow; 2s orange; 3s black; 3s green
1860/61 2kr yellow; 2kr orange; 3kr green;
2s yellow; 2s orange; 3s green
1863/64 2kr yellow; 2kr orange; 3kr green;
2s yellow; 2s orange; 3s green

Newspaper stamps

1850 0.6kr blue, 6kr yellow, 30kr rose
1858 l.05kr blue, 1.05kr lilac
1860/61 1.05kr lilac
1863/64 1.05kr lilac

These were printed to the private order of Ernst Fellner, a Viennese collector, between 1884 and 1887. The printing quality is tolerably good; the embossing usually flat; the colours similar to those of the 1887 reprints, however sometimes duller. The paper is thin white paper of poor quality, on average more or less laid without watermark. The gum is mostly thinly applied yellowish gum, but also thicker and brittle. The definitives are line perforated 10 with unsharp holes; they are also found imperforate.

Reprints of the 1850 issue are of the types and subtypes used in the last period of this issue. 1, 2, and 6Kr as well as 10, 15, 30 and 45 Ct are type III. The 3Kr is type IIIc and the 9Kr type IIIb, whilst the 5Ct is type III. The newspaper stamps of 1851 are type IIb and those of 1858 are type II. The number issued is unknown, but not very large.


Back to Austrian Stamps homepage Back to top Introduction Sources for this article Classification of Reprints
Table I - List of all official reprints by year of reprinting, with detailed descriptions of each Table II - List of all official reprints by issue, with quantities Table III - Reprint Die Proofs (1870) Table IV - Reprint Plate Proofs (1884) Table V - Fellner Reprints (1885?)

©Andy Taylor. Last updated 1 January 2005